Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biomed Res Int. 2016;2016:4702674. doi: 10.1155/2016/4702674. Epub 2016 Jan 6.

Cartilage Regeneration in Human with Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells: Current Status in Clinical Implications.

Author information

1
Stems Medical Clinic, 32-3 Chungdam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 06068, Republic of Korea.
2
Stems Medical Clinic, 32-3 Chungdam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 06068, Republic of Korea; National Leading Research Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Myongji University, 116 Myongjiro, Yongin, Gyeonggido 17058, Republic of Korea.
3
FMN Wellness & Antiaging Centre, Jalan Sangihe 15A, Jakarta Pusat 10150, Indonesia.
4
National Leading Research Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Myongji University, 116 Myongjiro, Yongin, Gyeonggido 17058, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common debilitating disorders among the elderly population. At present, there is no definite cure for the underlying causes of OA. However, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in the form of stromal vascular fraction (SVF) may offer an alternative at this time. ADSCs are one type of mesenchymal stem cells that have been utilized and have demonstrated an ability to regenerate cartilage. ADSCs have been shown to regenerate cartilage in a variety of animal models also. Non-culture-expanded ADSCs, in the form of SVF along with platelet rich plasma (PRP), have recently been used in humans to treat OA and other cartilage abnormalities. These ADSCs have demonstrated effectiveness without any serious side effects. However, due to regulatory issues, only ADSCs in the form of SVF are currently allowed for clinical uses in humans. Culture-expanded ADSCs, although more convenient, require clinical trials for a regulatory approval prior to uses in clinical settings. Here we present a systematic review of currently available clinical studies involving ADSCs in the form of SVF and in the culture-expanded form, with or without PRP, highlighting the clinical effectiveness and safety in treating OA.

PMID:
26881220
PMCID:
PMC4736810
DOI:
10.1155/2016/4702674
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Hindawi Limited Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center