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J Gastroenterol. 2016 Mar;51(3):177-94. doi: 10.1007/s00535-016-1166-4. Epub 2016 Feb 15.

Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease 2015.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, International University of Health and Welfare Hospital, 537-3 Iguchi, Nasushiobara-shi, Tochigi, 329-2763, Japan. kiichi@iuhw.ac.jp.
2
Guidelines Committee for creating and evaluating the "Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer", the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE), K-18 Building 8F, 8-9-13, Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo, 104-0061, Japan. kiichi@iuhw.ac.jp.
3
Guidelines Committee for creating and evaluating the "Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer", the Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE), K-18 Building 8F, 8-9-13, Ginza, Chuo, Tokyo, 104-0061, Japan.

Abstract

The Japanese Society of Gastroenterology (JSGE) revised the evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for peptic ulcer disease in 2014 and has created an English version. The revised guidelines consist of seven items: bleeding gastric and duodenal ulcers, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy, drug-induced ulcer, non-H. pylori, non-nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ulcer, surgical treatment, and conservative therapy for perforation and stenosis. Ninety clinical questions (CQs) were developed, and a literature search was performed for the CQs using the Medline, Cochrane, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi databases between 1983 and June 2012. The guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. Therapy is initially provided for ulcer complications. Perforation or stenosis is treated with surgery or conservatively. Ulcer bleeding is first treated by endoscopic hemostasis. If it fails, surgery or interventional radiology is chosen. Second, medical therapy is provided. In cases of NSAID-related ulcers, use of NSAIDs is stopped, and anti-ulcer therapy is provided. If NSAID use must continue, the ulcer is treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or prostaglandin analog. In cases with no NSAID use, H. pylori-positive patients receive eradication and anti-ulcer therapy. If first-line eradication therapy fails, second-line therapy is given. In cases of non-H. pylori, non-NSAID ulcers or H. pylori-positive patients with no indication for eradication therapy, non-eradication therapy is provided. The first choice is PPI therapy, and the second choice is histamine 2-receptor antagonist therapy. After initial therapy, maintenance therapy is provided to prevent ulcer relapse.

KEYWORDS:

Cyclooxygenase-2; Duodenal ulcer; Gastric ulcer; Helicobacter pylori eradication; Low-dose aspirin; Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug; Peptic ulcer; Stomach ulcer

PMID:
26879862
DOI:
10.1007/s00535-016-1166-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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