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Neurourol Urodyn. 2017 Mar;36(3):620-625. doi: 10.1002/nau.22975. Epub 2016 Feb 16.

The location of pain and urgency sensations during cystometry.

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1
Department of Urogynaecology, St. Mary's Hospital, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

AIMS:

The relationship between bladder pain and urinary urgency sensations is poorly understood. We analyzed the relationship between locations and intensities of urgency and pain sensations felt during filling cystometry.

METHODS:

Participants completed the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ) to indicate presence of bladder pain or urgency. During cystometry, participants scored the intensity of urgency and pain, both in the suprapubic and the urethral region, on a VAS scale of 0-10 at a baseline, at first desire, normal desire, strong desire to void, and at maximum cystometric capacity during filling. We allocated the participants to six groups; those reporting urgency or not, pain or not, both symptoms and neither. Friedman's Test was used to ascertain if all scores increased significantly, the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used to demonstrate the difference between scores, and agreement for findings during cystometry was tested with Mann-Whitney U.

RESULTS:

A total of 68 women participated; 38 participants reported pain, 57 reported urgency, and 33 reported both symptoms. Pain and urgency scores significantly increased during cystometry (P < 0.0001). For participants reporting pain, suprapubic pain was rated significantly higher than urethral pain. Participants reporting both symptoms, felt more urgency than pain, and again pain more suprapubically than urethrally. Participants reporting only urgency scored suprapubic and urethral urgency similarly at all desires.

CONCLUSIONS:

Pain and urgency are well differentiated sensations and are felt at different locations although pain is seemingly easier localized. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:620-625, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

C-fibers; bladder pain syndrome; bladder sensation; dermatoma; overactive bladder

PMID:
26879227
DOI:
10.1002/nau.22975
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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