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J Nutr Biochem. 2016 Feb;28:183-90. doi: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2015.10.016. Epub 2015 Nov 10.

Cinnamon intake alleviates the combined effects of dietary-induced insulin resistance and acute stress on brain mitochondria.

Author information

1
Laboratoire de Bioénergétique Fondamentale et Appliquée, Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38041 Grenoble cedex France; U1055 - INSERM, F-38041 Grenoble France.
2
Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center, United States Department of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD USA.
3
Département Neurosciences & Contraintes Opérationnelles, Institut de Recherche Biomédicale des Armées (IRBA), BP73, 91223 Brétigny-sur-Orge cedex, France; Ecole du Val de Grâce, 1 place Alphonse Laveran, 75230 Paris, France.
4
Laboratoire de Bioénergétique Fondamentale et Appliquée, Université Grenoble Alpes, F-38041 Grenoble cedex France; U1055 - INSERM, F-38041 Grenoble France. Electronic address: Cecile.Batandier@ujf-grenoble.fr.

Abstract

Insulin resistance (IR), which is a leading cause of the metabolic syndrome, results in early brain function alterations which may alter brain mitochondrial functioning. Previously, we demonstrated that rats fed a control diet and submitted to an acute restraint stress exhibited a delayed mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. In this study, we evaluated the combined effects of dietary and emotional stressors as found in western way of life. We studied, in rats submitted or not to an acute stress, the effects of diet-induced IR on brain mitochondria, using a high fat/high fructose diet (HF(2)), as an IR inducer, with addition or not of cinnamon as an insulin sensitizer. We measured Ca(2+) retention capacity, respiration, ROS production, enzymatic activities and cell signaling activation. Under stress, HF(2) diet dramatically decreased the amount of Ca(2+) required to open the mPTP (13%) suggesting an adverse effect on mitochondrial survival. Cinnamon added to the diet corrected this negative effect and resulted in a partial recovery (30%). The effects related to cinnamon addition to the diet could be due to its antioxidant properties or to the observed modulation of PI3K-AKT-GSK3β and MAPK-P38 pathways or to a combination of both. These data suggest a protective effect of cinnamon on brain mitochondria against the negative impact of an HF(2) diet. Cinnamon could be beneficial to counteract deleterious dietary effects in stressed conditions.

KEYWORDS:

Acute stress; Brain; Insulin resistance; Mitochondria; Permeability transition pore; Polyphenols

PMID:
26878796
DOI:
10.1016/j.jnutbio.2015.10.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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