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J Hosp Infect. 2016 Jun;93(2):117-20. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2015.12.010. Epub 2015 Dec 31.

Early impact of rotavirus vaccination in a large paediatric hospital in the UK.

Author information

1
Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; Field Epidemiology Services, Public Health England, Liverpool, UK. Electronic address: d.hungerford@liverpool.ac.uk.
2
CHICAS Group, Lancaster Medical School, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.
3
Department of Microbiology, Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK.
4
Field Epidemiology Services, Public Health England, Liverpool, UK.
5
Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
6
Virus Reference Department, Public Health England, Colindale, London, UK.
7
Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; Department of Microbiology, Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK.

Abstract

The impact of routine rotavirus vaccination on community-acquired (CA) and healthcare-associated (HA) rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) at a large paediatric hospital, UK, was investigated over a 13-year period. A total of 1644 hospitalized children aged 0-15 years tested positive for rotavirus between July 2002 and June 2015. Interrupted time-series analysis demonstrated that, post vaccine introduction (July 2013 to June 2015), CA- and HA-RVGE hospitalizations were 83% [95% confidence interval (CI): 72-90%) and 83% (95% CI: 66-92%] lower than expected, respectively. Rotavirus vaccination has rapidly reduced the hospital rotavirus disease burden among both CA- and HA-RVGE cases.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; Healthcare-associated infection; Rotavirus; Vaccination

PMID:
26876744
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhin.2015.12.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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