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Head Neck. 2016 Apr;38 Suppl 1:E2021-9. doi: 10.1002/hed.24372. Epub 2016 Feb 15.

Association between FAT1 mutation and overall survival in patients with human papillomavirus-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

Kim KT1, Kim BS1,2, Kim JH1,3.

Author information

1
Seoul National University Biomedical Informatics (SNUBI), Division of Biomedical Informatics, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Pathology, National Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
3
Systems Biomedical Informatics National Core Research Center (NCRC), Division of Biomedical Informatics, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The purpose of this study was to characterize the mutation profile of FAT atypical cadherin 1 (FAT1) and determine the prognostic significance of FAT1 mutation for overall survival in patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).

METHODS:

Data were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) data portals and used as discovery and validation sets. FAT1 mutational status was determined in 234 and 37 patients with HPV-negative HNSCC, respectively, and overall survival analysis was performed. For comparison, HPV-positive patients were also analyzed for overall survival.

RESULTS:

Most of the identified nonsynonymous somatic FAT1 mutations were loss-of-function mutations. FAT1 mutation was significantly associated with better overall survival in HPV-negative patients from both the TCGA cohort (p = .026) and the ICGC cohort (p = .047), but not in HPV-positive patients.

CONCLUSION:

FAT1 mutational status is a strong independent prognostic factor in patients with HPV-negative HNSCC. © 2016 The Authors Head & Neck Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E2021-E2029, 2016.

KEYWORDS:

FAT atypical cadherin 1; head and neck neoplasms; human papillomavirus; mutation; prognosis

PMID:
26876381
PMCID:
PMC5067633
DOI:
10.1002/hed.24372
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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