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Pharmacol Res. 2016 Apr;106:37-50. doi: 10.1016/j.phrs.2016.02.008. Epub 2016 Feb 10.

Nigella sativa (black seed) effects on plasma lipid concentrations in humans: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials.

Author information

1
Biotechnology Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran; Metabolic Research Centre, Royal Perth Hospital, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
2
Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
3
Biomedical Research Unit, Mexican Social Security Institute, Durango, Mexico.
4
Hepato-Metabolic Disease Unit, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, IRCCS, Rome, Italy.
5
Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. Electronic address: simona.bo@unito.it.

Abstract

The effects of Nigella sativa (NS) on plasma lipid concentrations are controversial. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted to obtain a conclusive result in humans. PubMed-Medline, SCOPUS, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases were searched (up to August 2015) to identify RCTs investigating the impact of NS on total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides concentrations. A random-effects model and the generic inverse variance weighting method were used for quantitative data synthesis. Meta-regression, sensitivity analysis, and publication bias assessments were performed using standard methods. A total of 17 RCTs examining the effects of NS on plasma lipid concentrations were included. Meta-analysis suggested a significant association between NS supplementation and a reduction in total cholesterol (weighed-mean-difference [WMD]: -15.65mg/dL, 95% CI: -24.67, -6.63, p=0.001), LDL-C (WMD: -14.10mg/dL, 95% CI: -19.32, -8.88, p<0.001), and triglyceride levels (WMD: -20.64mg/dL, 95% CI: -30.29, -11.00, p<0.001). No significant effect on HDL-C concentrations (WMD: 0.28mg/dL, 95% CI: -1.96, 2.53, p=0.804) was found. A greater effect of NS seed oil versus seed powder was observed on serum total cholesterol and LDL-C levels, and an increase in HDL-C levels was found only after NS seed powder supplementation. NS has a significant impact on plasma lipid concentrations, leading to lower total cholesterol, LDL-C, and TG levels while increased HDL-C is associated with NS powder only. Further RCTs are needed to explore the NS benefits on cardiovascular outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Cholesterol; HDL-cholesterol; Nigella sativa; Triglycerides

PMID:
26875640
DOI:
10.1016/j.phrs.2016.02.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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