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Ophthalmology. 2016 May;123(5):1043-52. doi: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.01.004. Epub 2016 Feb 11.

Retinal and Optic Nerve Hemorrhages in the Newborn Infant: One-Year Results of the Newborn Eye Screen Test Study.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Byers Eye Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California.
2
Department of Ophthalmology, Byers Eye Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California. Electronic address: dariusm@stanford.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To report the birth prevalence, risk factors, characteristics, and location of fundus hemorrhages (FHs) of the retina and optic nerve present in newborns at birth.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study at Stanford University School of Medicine.

PARTICIPANTS:

All infants who were 37 weeks postmenstrual age or older and stable were eligible for screening. Infants with known or suspected infectious conjunctivitis were excluded.

METHODS:

Infants born at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH) from July 25, 2013, through July 25, 2014, were offered universal newborn screening via wide-angle digital retinal photography in the Newborn Eye Screen Test study. Maternal, obstetric, and neonatal factors were obtained from hospital records. The location, retinal layer, and laterality of FH were recorded by 1 pediatric vitreoretinal specialist.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Birth prevalence of FH. Secondary outcomes included rate of adverse events, risk factors for FH, hemorrhage characteristics, and adverse events.

RESULTS:

The birth prevalence of FH in this study was 20.3% (41/202 infants). Ninety-five percent of FHs involved the periphery, 83% involved the macula, and 71% involved multiple layers of the retina. The fovea was involved in 15% of FH cases (birth prevalence, 3.0%). No cases of bilateral foveal hemorrhage were found. Fundus hemorrhages were more common in the left eye than the right. Fundus hemorrhages were most commonly optic nerve flame hemorrhages (48%) and white-centered retinal hemorrhages (30%). Retinal hemorrhages were found most frequently in all 4 quadrants (35%) and more often were multiple than solitary. Macular hemorrhages most often were intraretinal (40%). Among the risk factors examined in this study, vaginal delivery compared with cesarean section (odds ratio [OR], 9.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.57-33.97) showed the greatest level of association with FH. Self-identified ethnicity as Hispanic or Latino showed a protective effect (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.20-0.94). Other study factors were not significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Fundus hemorrhages are common among newborns. They often involve multiple areas and layers of the retina. Vaginal delivery was associated with a significantly increased risk of FH, whereas self-identified Hispanic or Latino ethnicity was protective against FH in this study. The long-term consequences of FH on visual development remain unknown.

PMID:
26875004
PMCID:
PMC4918466
DOI:
10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.01.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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