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Mol Nutr Food Res. 2016 Jul;60(7):1661-72. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201500785. Epub 2016 May 4.

Lean-seafood intake decreases urinary markers of mitochondrial lipid and energy metabolism in healthy subjects: Metabolomics results from a randomized crossover intervention study.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science, Aarhus University, Aarslev, Denmark.
2
National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research, Bergen, Norway.
3
Bergen University College, Faculty of Education, Bergen, Norway.
4
Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
5
School of Nutrition, Laval Université, Québec, Canada.
6
Hormone Laboratory, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
7
Department of Food Science, Aarhus University, Foulum, Denmark.

Abstract

SCOPE:

Proteins constitute an important part of the human diet, but understanding of the effects of different dietary protein sources on human metabolism is sparse. We aimed to elucidate diet-induced metabolic changes through untargeted urinary metabolomics after four weeks of intervention with lean-seafood or nonseafood diets. It is shown that lean-seafood intake reduces urinary excretion of metabolites involved in mitochondrial lipid and energy metabolism possibly facilitating a higher lipid catabolism in healthy subjects.

METHODS:

In a randomized controlled trial with crossover design, 20 healthy subjects consumed two balanced diets that varied in main protein sources for 4 weeks. Morning spot urine samples were collected before and after each intervention period. Untargeted metabolomics based on (1) H NMR spectroscopy and LC-MS analyses were applied to characterize the urinary metabolic response to the interventions.

RESULTS:

The lean-seafood diet period reduced the urinary level of l-carnitine, 2,6-dimethylheptanoylcarnitine, and N-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide, relative to the nonseafood period. The dietary analysis revealed that the higher urinary level of trimethylamine-N-oxide after the lean-seafood diet period and guanidinoacetate and 3-methylhistidine after the nonseafood diet period was related to the endogenous content of these compounds in the diets.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data reveal that 4 weeks of lean-seafood intake reduces urinary excretion of metabolites involved in mitochondrial lipid and energy metabolism possibly facilitating a higher lipid catabolism in healthy subjects after the lean-seafood intake.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarkers; Dietary protein; Lipid metabolism; Metabolism; Urine

PMID:
26873789
DOI:
10.1002/mnfr.201500785
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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