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Dig Dis Sci. 2016 Jul;61(7):1862-9. doi: 10.1007/s10620-016-4061-1. Epub 2016 Feb 12.

Continuing Medical Education Improves Gastroenterologists' Compliance with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Quality Measures.

Author information

1
PRIME Education, Inc., 8201 West McNab Road, Tamarac, FL, 33321, USA. t.sapir@primeinc.org.
2
PRIME Education, Inc., 8201 West McNab Road, Tamarac, FL, 33321, USA.
3
Indegene Total Therapeutic Management, 300 Townpark Dr #100, Kennesaw, GA, 30144, USA.
4
Department of Gastroenterology, University of Michigan Health System, 1500 E Medical Center Dr # 391, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Low rates of compliance with quality measures for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been reported for US gastroenterologists.

AIMS:

We assessed the influence of quality improvement (QI) education on compliance with physician quality reporting system (PQRS) measures for IBD and measures related to National Quality Strategy (NQS) priorities.

METHODS:

Forty community-based gastroenterologists participated in the QI study; 20 were assigned to educational intervention and control groups, respectively. At baseline, randomly selected charts of patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis were retrospectively reviewed for the gastroenterologists' performance of 8 PQRS IBD measures and 4 NQS-related measures. The intervention group participated in a series of accredited continuing medical education (CME) activities focusing on QI. Follow-up chart reviews were conducted 6 months after the CME activities. Independent t tests were conducted to compare between-group differences in baseline-to-follow-up rates of documented compliance with each measure.

RESULTS:

The analysis included 299 baseline charts and 300 follow-up charts. The intervention group had significantly greater magnitudes of improvement than the control group for the following measures: assessment of IBD type, location, and activity (+14 %, p = 0.009); influenza vaccination (+13 %, p = 0.025); pneumococcal vaccination (+20 %, p = 0.003); testing for latent tuberculosis before anti-TNF-α therapy (+10 %, p = 0.028); assessment of hepatitis B virus status before anti-TNF-α therapy (+9 %, p = 0.010); assessment of side effects (+17 %, p = 0.048), and counseling patients about cancer risks (+13 %, p = 0.013).

CONCLUSIONS:

QI-focused CME improves community-based gastroenterologists' compliance with IBD quality measures and measures aligned with NQS priorities.

KEYWORDS:

Continuing medical education; Inflammatory bowel disease; Physician quality reporting system; Quality improvement

PMID:
26873536
DOI:
10.1007/s10620-016-4061-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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