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Life Sci. 2016 Mar 1;148:211-9. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2016.02.021. Epub 2016 Feb 9.

Pregabalin can prevent, but not treat, cognitive dysfunction following abdominal surgery in aged rats.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Kochi Medical School, Nankoku, Japan. Electronic address: takashika@kochi-u.ac.jp.
2
Department of Dental Anesthesiology, Tokushima University School of Dentistry, Japan.
3
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Kochi Medical School, Nankoku, Japan.

Abstract

AIMS:

The present study aimed to explore the preventive or therapeutic effect of peri-operative pregabalin treatment on the memory deficits and related hippocampal inflammation following surgery in aged rats.

MAIN METHODS:

Aged rats underwent abdominal or sham surgery, and were then divided into 2 groups, either early or late pregabalin treatment. Fourteen days after surgery, the cognitive function was assessed using novel object recognition test, followed by measurement of hippocampal cytokines and voltage-dependent calcium channel α2δ subunit (CACNA2D1). The parabiotic experiments determined whether the humoral or neuronal pathway was involved in the neuroinflammation development following the abdominal surgery. The effects of pregabalin on LPS-induced cytokine release from hippocampal microglia were also evaluated.

KEY FINDINGS:

Early pregabalin treatment, which was administered pre-operatively and continued for 3 or 7days after surgery, prevented memory deficits and decreased hippocampal pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. In contrast, no beneficial effects were observed when pregabalin was administered late in the post-operative period. The hippocampal levels of CACNA2D1 did not change under any experimental condition. The data from the cross-circulation (parabiosis) experiments indicated that abdominal surgery may induce neuroinflammation via a neural transmission pathway from the periphery to the brain. The ex vivo experiments further demonstrated that pregabalin had no effect on LPS-induced cytokines release from hippocampal microglia.

SIGNIFICANCE:

Our findings highlight reveal that peri-operative pregabalin treatment during the early post-operative period can prevent neuroinflammation and memory deficits after surgery. It is likely this occurs through a peripheral and central neuro-immune interaction rather than through direct anti-inflammatory effects.

KEYWORDS:

Microglia; Neuroinflammation; Post-operative cognitive dysfunction

PMID:
26872983
DOI:
10.1016/j.lfs.2016.02.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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