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Arch Cardiovasc Dis. 2016 Apr;109(4):242-53. doi: 10.1016/j.acvd.2015.10.005. Epub 2016 Jan 19.

Prospective association of sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverage intake with risk of hypertension.

Author information

1
Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyunghee-daero, Dongdaemun-gu, 130-701 Seoul, South Korea.
2
Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyunghee-daero, Dongdaemun-gu, 130-701 Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: youjinje@khu.ac.kr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Several observational studies have suggested that high consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs) is associated with increased blood pressure, but this relationship has not been investigated comprehensively.

AIMS:

To quantitatively examine the association between sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverage intake and risk of hypertension.

METHODS:

We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of eligible prospective cohort studies, identified by searching PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases up to May 2015. Pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model, and generalized least-squares trend estimation was used to assess dose-response relationships.

RESULTS:

Six studies (246,822 subjects and 80,628 incident cases of hypertension) were identified for the meta-analysis of SSBs and hypertension. The pooled RR of hypertension in the highest category of SSB consumption (≥1 serving/day, mean) compared with the lowest category of SSB (<0.6 serving/month, mean) was 1.12 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.17). In a dose-response analysis, a 1 serving/day increase in SSB intake was associated with an 8% increased risk of hypertension (RR: 1.08, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.11). Four studies (227,254 subjects and 78,177 incident cases of hypertension) were included in the meta-analysis of ASBs and hypertension. The pooled RRs were 1.14 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.18) for highest versus lowest analysis and 1.09 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.11) for every additional 1 serving/day increase in ASB consumption. The positive association did not vary significantly by sex, duration of follow-up or adjustment for body mass index.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings indicate that high SSB and ASB consumption is associated with an increased risk of hypertension.

KEYWORDS:

Blood pressure; Boissons avec édulcorants de synthèse; HTA; Hypertension; Meta-analysis; Méta-analyse; Pression artérielle; Prospective cohort studies; Sweetened beverage; Étude de cohorte

PMID:
26869455
DOI:
10.1016/j.acvd.2015.10.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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