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Vaccine. 2016 Mar 8;34(11):1335-42. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.02.008. Epub 2016 Feb 8.

Parental report of vaccine receipt in children with autism spectrum disorder: Do rates differ by pattern of ASD onset?

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, 8080 N. Stadium Drive, Suite 180, Houston, TX 77054, United States; Autism Center, Texas Children's Hospital, 8080 N. Stadium Drive, Suite 180, Houston, TX 77054, United States. Electronic address: kochel@bcm.edu.
2
Department of Psychological, Health, and Learning Sciences, University of Houston, 491 Farish Hall, Houston, TX 77204, United States.
3
Center for Clinical Research and Evidence-Based Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, 6431 Fannin Street, MSB 2.106, Houston, TX 77030, United States.
4
Dan L. Duncan Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Suite 100D, Houston, TX 77030, United States.
5
Immunization Project, Texas Children's Hospital, 1102 Bates Avenue, Suite 1550, Houston, TX 77030, United States.
6
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, 8080 N. Stadium Drive, Suite 180, Houston, TX 77054, United States; Immunization Project, Texas Children's Hospital, 1102 Bates Avenue, Suite 1550, Houston, TX 77030, United States.

Abstract

A contentious theory espoused by some parents is that regressive-onset of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is triggered by vaccines. If this were true, then vaccine receipt should be higher in children with regressive-onset ASD compared with other patterns of onset. Parental report of rate of receipt for six vaccines (DPT/DTaP, HepB, Hib, polio, MMR, varicella) was examined in children with ASD (N=2755) who were categorized by pattern of ASD onset (early onset, plateau, delay-plus-regression, regression). All pairwise comparisons were significantly equivalent within a 10% margin for all vaccines except varicella, for which the delay-plus-regression group had lower rates of receipt (81%) than the early-onset (87%) and regression (87%) groups. Findings do not support a connection between regressive-onset ASD and vaccines in this cohort.

KEYWORDS:

ASD; Autism; Immunizations; Onset; Parent perception; Regression; Vaccines

PMID:
26868082
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.02.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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