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Epigenomics. 2016 May;8(5):599-618. doi: 10.2217/epi-2016-0001. Epub 2016 Feb 11.

Tobacco smoking-associated genome-wide DNA methylation changes in the EPIC study.

Author information

1
International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France.
2
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
3
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany.
4
Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.
5
WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition & Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology & Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology & Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece.
6
Molecular & Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research & Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy.
7
Epidemiology & Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milano, Italy.
8
Human Genetic Foundation (HuGeF), Torino, Italy.
9
Cancer Registry & Histopathology Unit, 'Civic MP Arezzo' Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Italy.
10
Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
11
Department of Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health & the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
12
Department of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
13
Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.
14
Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
15
Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences & Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
16
MRC-PHE Centre for Environment & Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, UK.
17
Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain.
18
Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
19
CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain.
20
Department of Health & Social Sciences, Universidad de Murcia, Spain.
21
Public Health Institute of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.
22
IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain.
23
Public Health Direction and Biodonostia-Ciberesp, Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebastian, Spain.
24
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
25
School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK.

Abstract

AIM:

Epigenetic changes may occur in response to environmental stressors, and an altered epigenome pattern may represent a stable signature of environmental exposure.

MATERIALS & METHODS:

Here, we examined the potential of DNA methylation changes in 910 prediagnostic peripheral blood samples as a marker of exposure to tobacco smoke in a large multinational cohort.

RESULTS:

We identified 748 CpG sites that were differentially methylated between smokers and nonsmokers, among which we identified novel regionally clustered CpGs associated with active smoking. Importantly, we found a marked reversibility of methylation changes after smoking cessation, although specific genes remained differentially methylated up to 22 years after cessation.

CONCLUSION:

Our study has comprehensively cataloged the smoking-associated DNA methylation alterations and showed that these alterations are reversible after smoking cessation.

KEYWORDS:

DNA methylome; epigenetic signature; prospective cohort; tobacco smoking

PMID:
26864933
DOI:
10.2217/epi-2016-0001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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