Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Complement Ther Med. 2016 Feb;24:7-12. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2015.11.002. Epub 2015 Nov 25.

Complementary and integrative healthcare for patients with mechanical low back pain in a U.S. hospital setting.

Author information

1
Integrative Health & Wellbeing Research Program, Center for Spirituality & Healing, Academic Health Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States; Department of Pharmaceutical Care and Health Systems, College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States. Electronic address: rhee0041@umn.edu.
2
Integrative Health & Wellbeing Research Program, Center for Spirituality & Healing, Academic Health Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States.
3
Division of Health Policy & Management, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States.
4
Penny George Institute of Health and Healing, Allina Health, Minneapolis, MN, United States.
5
Integrative Health & Wellbeing Research Program, Center for Spirituality & Healing, Academic Health Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States; Division of Health Policy & Management, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States; Division of Epidemiology & Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Complementary and integrative healthcare (CIH) is commonly used to treat low back pain (LBP). While the use of CIH within hospitals is increasing, little is known regarding the delivery of these services within inpatient settings. We examine the patterns of CIH services among inpatients with mechanical LBP in a hospital setting.

METHODS:

This is a retrospective, practice-based study conducted at Abbot Northwestern hospital in Minnesota. Using electronic health record data from July 2009 to December 2012, 8095 inpatients with mechanical LBP were identified using ICD-9 codes. We classified patients by reason for hospitalization. We examined demographic and clinical characteristics by receipt of CIH services. Then, we estimated the prevalence of types of CIH delivered and clinical foci for CIH visits among inpatients with mechanical LBP.

RESULTS:

Most inpatients with mechanical LBP (>90%) were hospitalized for surgical procedures. Overall, 14.2% received inpatient CIH services. All demographic and clinical characteristics differed by receipt of CIH (P<0.001), except race/ethnicity. CIH recipients were in poorer health than those who did not. Most commonly delivered CIH services were massage (62.1%), relaxation techniques (42.0%) and acupuncture (25.7%). Pain (45.1%), relaxation (17.5%), and comfort (8.2%) were the top three reasons for CIH visits.

CONCLUSION:

There are important differences between CIH recipients and non-CIH recipients among patients with mechanical LBP within a hospital setting. The reasons documented for CIH visits included addressing physical, emotional and/or mental conditions of patients. Future studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of CIH services health and wellbeing outcomes in this population.

KEYWORDS:

Complementary and integrative healthcare; Inpatient; Mechanical low back problems

PMID:
26860795
PMCID:
PMC4749918
DOI:
10.1016/j.ctim.2015.11.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center