Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Maturitas. 2016 Mar;85:64-70. doi: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2015.12.014. Epub 2016 Jan 2.

Small Steps: Preliminary effectiveness and feasibility of an incremental goal-setting intervention to reduce sitting time in older adults.

Author information

1
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia; Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), Sansom Institute for Health Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia. Electronic address: lucy.lewis@flinders.edu.au.
2
Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), Sansom Institute for Health Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia; Diabetes Research Centre, University of Leicester, Leicester Diabetes Centre, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, Leicestershire LE5 4PW, United Kingdom; National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester-Loughborough Diet, Lifestyle and Physical Activity Biomedical Research Unit (BRU), Leicester Diabetes Centre, Leicester General Hospital, Leicester, Leicestershire LE5 4PW, United Kingdom. Electronic address: alex.rowlands@leicester.ac.uk.
3
The University of Queensland, School of Public Health, Brisbane, Australia; Mater Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. Electronic address: p.gardiner@sph.uq.edu.au.
4
Department for Health, University of Bath, Bath, United Kingdom. Electronic address: m.standage@bath.ac.uk.
5
Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), Sansom Institute for Health Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia. Electronic address: Coralie.english@unisa.edu.au.
6
Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity (ARENA), Sansom Institute for Health Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia. Electronic address: tim.olds@unisa.edu.au.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary effectiveness and feasibility of a theory-informed program to reduce sitting time in older adults.

DESIGN:

Pre-experimental (pre-post) study. Thirty non-working adult (≥ 60 years) participants attended a one hour face-to-face intervention session and were guided through: a review of their sitting time; normative feedback on sitting time; and setting goals to reduce total sitting time and bouts of prolonged sitting. Participants chose six goals and integrated one per week incrementally for six weeks. Participants received weekly phone calls.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Sitting time and bouts of prolonged sitting (≥ 30 min) were measured objectively for seven days (activPAL3c inclinometer) pre- and post-intervention. During these periods, a 24-h time recall instrument was administered by computer-assisted telephone interview. Participants completed a post-intervention project evaluation questionnaire. Paired t tests with sequential Bonferroni corrections and Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated for all outcomes.

RESULTS:

Twenty-seven participants completed the assessments (71.7 ± 6.5 years). Post-intervention, objectively-measured total sitting time was significantly reduced by 51.5 min per day (p=0.006; d=-0.58) and number of bouts of prolonged sitting by 0.8 per day (p=0.002; d=-0.70). Objectively-measured standing increased by 39 min per day (p=0.006; d=0.58). Participants self-reported spending 96 min less per day sitting (p<0.001; d=-0.77) and 32 min less per day watching television (p=0.005; d=-0.59). Participants were highly satisfied with the program.

CONCLUSION:

The 'Small Steps' program is a feasible and promising avenue for behavioral modification to reduce sitting time in older adults.

KEYWORDS:

Adults; Aged; Sedentary behavior; Sitting

PMID:
26857881
DOI:
10.1016/j.maturitas.2015.12.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center