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Mult Scler Relat Disord. 2016 Jan;5:12-26. doi: 10.1016/j.msard.2015.10.004. Epub 2015 Oct 19.

Systematic review and meta-analysis of interventions for depression and anxiety in persons with multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Canada R3A1R9.
2
Department of Clinical Health Psychology, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, 771 Bannatyne Avenue, Winnipeg, Canada R3E3N4.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Canada R3A1R9; George and Fay Yee Centre for Health Care Innovation, University of Manitoba, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Canada R3A1R9.
4
George and Fay Yee Centre for Health Care Innovation, University of Manitoba, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Canada R3A1R9.
5
Departments of Community Health Sciences and Psychiatry, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, Canada T2N4Z6.
6
Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, 771 Bannatyne Avenue, Winnipeg, Canada R3E3N4.
7
Departments of Psychiatry, Medicine, Psychology & Neuroscience, Dalhousie University, 6299 South Street, Halifax, Canada B3H4R2.
8
Department of Family Medicine, University of Manitoba, 400 Tache Avenue, Winnipeg, Canada R2H3E1.
9
Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Canada R3A1R9; Department of Community Health Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, 820 Sherbrooke Street, Winnipeg, Canada R3A1R9. Electronic address: rmarrie@hsc.mb.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Depression and anxiety are common in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), and adversely affect fatigue, medication adherence, and quality of life. Though effective treatments for depression and anxiety exist in the general population, their applicability in the MS population has not been definitively established.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the overall effect of psychological and pharmacological treatments for depression or anxiety in persons with MS.

METHODS:

We searched the Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES Full Text, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Scopus databases using systematic review methodology from database inception until March 25, 2015. Two independent reviewers screened abstracts, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias and strength of evidence. We included controlled clinical trials reporting on the effect of pharmacological or psychological interventions for depression or anxiety in a sample of persons with MS. We calculated standardized mean differences (SMD) and pooled using random effects meta-analysis.

RESULTS:

Of 1753 abstracts screened, 21 articles reporting on 13 unique clinical trials met the inclusion criteria. Depression severity improved in nine psychological trials of depression treatment (N=307; SMD: -0.45 (95%CI: -0.74, -0.16)). The severity of depression also improved in three pharmacological trials of depression treatment (SMD: -0.63 (N=165; 95%CI: -1.07, -0.20)). For anxiety, only a single trial examined psychological therapy for injection phobia and reported no statistically significant improvement.

CONCLUSION:

Pharmacological and psychological treatments for depression were effective in reducing depressive symptoms in MS. The data are insufficient to determine the effectiveness of treatments for anxiety.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; Depression; Meta-analysis; Multiple sclerosis; Systematic review; Treatment

PMID:
26856938
DOI:
10.1016/j.msard.2015.10.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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