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Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2016 Mar 25;60(4):2567-71. doi: 10.1128/AAC.02536-15. Print 2016 Apr.

Antimicrobial Resistance in Salmonella in the United States from 1948 to 1995.

Author information

1
U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Veterinary Medicine, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Laurel, Maryland, USA.
2
National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
3
U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Veterinary Medicine, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Maryland, USA.
4
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
5
U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Veterinary Medicine, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Laurel, Maryland, USA patrick.mcdermott@fda.hhs.gov.

Abstract

We conducted a retrospective study of 2,149 clinicalSalmonellastrains to help document the historical emergence of antimicrobial resistance. There were significant increases in resistance to older drugs, including ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline, which were most common inSalmonella entericaserotype Typhimurium. An increase in multidrug resistance was observed for each decade since the 1950s. These data help show howSalmonellaevolved over the past 6 decades, after the introduction of new antimicrobial agents.

PMID:
26856840
PMCID:
PMC4808194
DOI:
10.1128/AAC.02536-15
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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