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Eur J Appl Physiol. 2016 Apr;116(4):791-804. doi: 10.1007/s00421-016-3336-8. Epub 2016 Feb 8.

The rat closely mimics oxidative stress and inflammation in humans after exercise but not after exercise combined with vitamin C administration.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Education and Sports Science at Serres, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Agios Ioannis, 62110, Serres, Greece.
2
Department of Physical Education and Sport Science, University of Thessaly, Karies, Trikala, Greece.
3
Department of Health Sciences, School of Sciences, European University Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus.
4
Intensive Care Unit, 424 General Military Hospital of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
5
Department of Hematology, Blood Bank, General Hospital of Serres, Serres, Greece.
6
Department of Physical Education and Sports Science at Serres, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Agios Ioannis, 62110, Serres, Greece. nikolaidis@auth.gr.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of the present study was to directly compare oxidative stress and inflammation responses between rats and humans.

METHODS:

We contrasted rat and human oxidative stress and inflammatory responses to exercise (pro-oxidant stimulus) and/or vitamin C (anti-oxidant stimulus) administration. Vitamin C was administered orally in both species (16 mg kg(-1) of body weight). Twelve redox biomarkers and seven inflammatory biomarkers were determined in plasma and erythrocytes pre- and post-exercise or pre- and post-exercise combined with vitamin C administration.

RESULTS:

Exercise increased oxidative stress and induced an inflammatory state in rats and humans. There were only 1/19 significant species × exercise interactions (catalase), indicating similar responses to exercise between rats and humans in redox and inflammatory biomarkers. Vitamin C decreased oxidative stress and increased antioxidant capacity only in humans and did not affect the redox state of rats. In contrast, vitamin C induced an anti-inflammatory state only in rats and did not affect the inflammatory state of humans. There were 10/19 significant species × vitamin C interactions, indicating that rats poorly mimic human oxidative stress and inflammatory responses to vitamin C administration. Exercise after acute vitamin C administration altered redox state only in humans and did not affect the redox state of rats. On the contrary, inflammation biomarkers changed similarly after exercise combined with vitamin C in both rats and humans.

CONCLUSIONS:

The rat adequately mimics human responses to exercise in basic blood redox/inflammatory profile, yet this is not the case after exercise combined with vitamin C administration.

KEYWORDS:

Animal models; Biomarkers; Exercise; Human; Rat; Vitamin C

PMID:
26856335
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-016-3336-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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