Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Niger J Clin Pract. 2016 Mar-Apr;19(2):227-32. doi: 10.4103/1119-3077.164347.

Evaluation of correct knowledge of key danger signs in pregnancy among antenatal clinic attendees at a tertiary health facility in Nigeria.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan/University College Hospital, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Test of knowledge of pregnant women on key danger signs as a marker to assess the quality of information shared during health education at the antenatal clinic (ANC) is desirable.

AIM:

The aim was to assess correct knowledge of danger signs among pregnant women who attend ANC.

SETTINGS AND DESIGN:

A cross-sectional design conducted among pregnant women at the ANC of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A pretested structured questionnaire that contains sociodemographics, past obstetrics history, and a list of test questions to assess correct knowledge of danger signs was administered to each consenting participant.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED:

Descriptive and bivariate analyses were performed. The knowledge score of key danger signs in pregnancy (KDSP) was measured on a scale of 0-7 and participants were scored as having poor (0-2), fair (3-4), or good (5-7) knowledge. The reliability of the questionnaire to assess knowledge score was determined with Cronbach's alpha. Statistical significance was set 5%. STATA 12.0 Software was used.

RESULTS:

The mean age of respondents was 30.28 ± 4.56 with the majority (75.1%) of respondents aged 26-35 years. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.871. In general, the knowledge score was good and the associated factors on bivariate analysis were younger age (P = 0.028), Islamic religion (P = 0.048), ethnicity (P = 0.03), professional occupation (P = 0.01), and previous attendance of health talk on KDSP (P < 0.0001).

CONCLUSION:

There was a high knowledge score of KDSP, but some still have some misconceptions that need to be addressed.

PMID:
26856286
DOI:
10.4103/1119-3077.164347
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Medknow Publications and Media Pvt Ltd
Loading ...
Support Center