Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PeerJ. 2016 Feb 1;4:e1652. doi: 10.7717/peerj.1652. eCollection 2016.

Patterns of bird-window collisions inform mitigation on a university campus.

Author information

1
Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University , Durham, NC , United States.
2
Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States; Ecology & Environment Inc., Arlington, VA, United States.
3
Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States; Tourism Development Department, Okaloosa County, Fort Walton Beach, FL, United States.

Abstract

Bird-window collisions cause an estimated one billion bird deaths annually in the United States. Building characteristics and surrounding habitat affect collision frequency. Given the importance of collisions as an anthropogenic threat to birds, mitigation is essential. Patterned glass and UV-reflective films have been proven to prevent collisions. At Duke University's West campus in Durham, North Carolina, we set out to identify the buildings and building characteristics associated with the highest frequencies of collisions in order to propose a mitigation strategy. We surveyed six buildings, stratified by size, and measured architectural characteristics and surrounding area variables. During 21 consecutive days in spring and fall 2014, and spring 2015, we conducted carcass surveys to document collisions. In addition, we also collected ad hoc collision data year-round and recorded the data using the app iNaturalist. Consistent with previous studies, we found a positive relationship between glass area and collisions. Fitzpatrick, the building with the most window area, caused the most collisions. Schwartz and the Perk, the two small buildings with small window areas, had the lowest collision frequencies. Penn, the only building with bird deterrent pattern, caused just two collisions, despite being almost completely made out of glass. Unlike many research projects, our data collection led to mitigation action. A resolution supported by the student government, including news stories in the local media, resulted in the application of a bird deterrent film to the building with the most collisions: Fitzpatrick. We present our collision data and mitigation result to inspire other researchers and organizations to prevent bird-window collisions.

KEYWORDS:

Advocacy; Building structure; Carcass survey; Collision prevention; Surrounding area; Window area

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PeerJ, Inc. Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center