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Environ Toxicol Pharmacol. 2016 Mar;42:170-5. doi: 10.1016/j.etap.2016.01.016. Epub 2016 Jan 23.

H3K9 acetylation change patterns in rats after exposure to traffic-related air pollution.

Author information

1
Environmental Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Environmental Medicine, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
2
Environmental Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Environmental Medicine, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China. Electronic address: jinedu@zju.edu.cn.
3
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
4
Institute of Pharmacology, Zhejiang University School of Pharmacology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.

Abstract

Traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) has been acknowledged as a potential risk factor for numerous respiratory disorders including lung cancer; however, the exact mechanisms involved are still unclear. Here we investigated the effects of TRAP exposure on the H3K9 acetylation in rats. The exposure was performed in both spring and autumn with identical study procedures. In each season, 48 healthy Wistar rats were exposed to different levels of TRAP for 4 h, 7 d, 14 d, and 28 d, respectively. H3K9 acetylation levels in both the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and lung tissues were quantified. Multiple linear regression was applied to assess the influence of air pollutants on H3K9 acetylation levels. The levels of PM2.5, PM10, and NO2 in the tunnel and crossroad groups were significantly higher than in the control group. The H3K9 acetylation levels were not significantly different between spring and autumn. When spring and autumn data were analyzed together, no significant association between the TRAP and H3K9 acetylation was found in 4h exposure window. However, in the 7 d exposure window, PM2.5 and PM10 exposures were associated with changes in H3K9 acetylation ranging from 0.276 (0.053, 0.498) to 0.475 (0.103, 0.848) per 1 μg/m(3) increase in the pollutant concentration. In addition, prolonged exposure of the rats in the tunnel showed that both PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations were positively associated with H3k9 acetylation in both PBMCs and lung tissues. The findings showed that 7-d and prolonged TRAP exposure could effectively increase the H3K9 acetylation level in both PBMCs and lung tissues of rats.

KEYWORDS:

Acetylation; H3K9; Particulate matter; Traffic-related air pollution

PMID:
26855416
DOI:
10.1016/j.etap.2016.01.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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