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Hum Brain Mapp. 2016 Apr;37(4):1393-404. doi: 10.1002/hbm.23108. Epub 2016 Feb 8.

Computational meta-analysis of statistical parametric maps in major depression.

Author information

1
Centre for Affective Disorders, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
2
Neuroimaging Sciences, the University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
3
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas.
4
Department of Radiology, Nihon University School of Medicine, Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo, Japan.
5
Trinity College School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Neuroimaging Group, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
6
Department of Psychiatry, the 1st Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming, People's Republic of China.
7
Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
8
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany.
9
Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California.
10
Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
11
Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire.
12
Dutch Autism & ADHD Research Center Brain and Cognition, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
13
Disciplinas De Psiquiatria E Psicologia Médica Da Faculdade De Medicina Do ABC Coordenadora Da Enfermaria De Psiquiatria Do Hospital Estadual Mário Covas, San Paolo, Brazil.
14
Neuroscience Experimental Medicine, Janssen Research & Development, Raritan, New Jersey.
15
Neuroimaging Centre, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands.
16
Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition/Psychiatric Neuroimaging, Leiden University and Department of Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands.
17
Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
18
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany.
19
Division of Psychiatry, the University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Several neuroimaging meta-analyses have summarized structural brain changes in major depression using coordinate-based methods. These methods might be biased toward brain regions where significant differences were found in the original studies. In this study, a novel voxel-based technique is implemented that estimates and meta-analyses between-group differences in grey matter from individual MRI studies, which are then applied to the study of major depression.

METHODS:

A systematic review and meta-analysis of voxel-based morphometry studies were conducted comparing participants with major depression and healthy controls by using statistical parametric maps. Summary effect sizes were computed correcting for multiple comparisons at the voxel level. Publication bias and heterogeneity were also estimated and the excess of heterogeneity was investigated with metaregression analyses.

RESULTS:

Patients with major depression were characterized by diffuse bilateral grey matter loss in ventrolateral and ventromedial frontal systems extending into temporal gyri compared to healthy controls. Grey matter reduction was also detected in the right parahippocampal and fusiform gyri, hippocampus, and bilateral thalamus. Other areas included parietal lobes and cerebellum. There was no evidence of statistically significant publication bias or heterogeneity.

CONCLUSIONS:

The novel computational meta-analytic approach used in this study identified extensive grey matter loss in key brain regions implicated in emotion generation and regulation. Results are not biased toward the findings of the original studies because they include all available imaging data, irrespective of statistically significant regions, resulting in enhanced detection of additional areas of grey matter loss.

KEYWORDS:

affective disorders; depression; magnetic resonance imaging; meta-analysis

PMID:
26854015
DOI:
10.1002/hbm.23108
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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