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Neuron. 2016 Feb 17;89(4):857-66. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2016.01.011. Epub 2016 Feb 4.

Direct Ventral Hippocampal-Prefrontal Input Is Required for Anxiety-Related Neural Activity and Behavior.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, USA.
2
Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, USA.
3
Department of Neuroscience, Barnard College, 3009 Broadway, New York, NY 10027, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, USA.
5
Department of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics, Columbia University, 622 West 168(th) Street, New York, NY 10032, USA.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032, USA; Division of Integrative Neuroscience, New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032 USA. Electronic address: jg343@columbia.edu.

Abstract

The ventral hippocampus (vHPC), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and basolateral amygdala (BLA) are each required for the expression of anxiety-like behavior. Yet the role of each individual element of the circuit is unclear. The projection from the vHPC to the mPFC has been implicated in anxiety-related neural synchrony and spatial representations of aversion. The role of this projection was examined using multi-site neural recordings combined with optogenetic terminal inhibition. Inhibition of vHPC input to the mPFC disrupted anxiety and mPFC representations of aversion, and reduced theta synchrony in a pathway-, frequency- and task-specific manner. Moreover, bilateral, but not unilateral, inhibition altered physiological correlates of anxiety in the BLA, mimicking a safety-like state. These results reveal a specific role for the vHPC-mPFC projection in anxiety-related behavior and the spatial representation of aversive information within the mPFC.

PMID:
26853301
PMCID:
PMC4760847
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2016.01.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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