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Prosthet Orthot Int. 2017 Feb;41(1):19-25. doi: 10.1177/0309364616628341. Epub 2016 Jul 9.

The impact of gender, level of amputation and diabetes on prosthetic fit rates following major lower extremity amputation.

Author information

1
1 University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.
2
2 MRC, Glasgow, UK.
3
3 NHS GGC, Diabetes Centre, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Diabetes mellitus is a leading cause of major lower extremity amputation.

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the influence of gender, level of amputation and diabetes mellitus status on being fit with a prosthetic limb following lower extremity amputation for peripheral arterial disease.

STUDY DESIGN:

Retrospective analysis of the Scottish Physiotherapy Amputee Research Group dataset.

RESULTS:

Within the cohort with peripheral arterial disease ( n = 1735), 64% were men ( n = 1112) and 48% ( n = 834) had diabetes mellitus. Those with diabetes mellitus were younger than those without: mean 67.5 and 71.1 years, respectively ( p < 0.001). Trans-tibial amputation:trans-femoral amputation ratio was 2.33 in those with diabetes mellitus, and 0.93 in those without. A total of 41% of those with diabetes mellitus were successfully fit with a prosthetic limb compared to 38% of those without diabetes mellitus. Male gender positively predicted fitting with a prosthetic limb at both trans-tibial amputation ( p = 0.001) and trans-femoral amputation ( p = 0.001) levels. Bilateral amputations and increasing age were negative predictors of fitting with a prosthetic limb ( p < 0.001). Diabetes mellitus negatively predicted fitting with a prosthetic limb at trans-femoral amputation level ( p < 0.001). Mortality was 17% for the cohort, 22% when the amputation was at trans-femoral amputation level.

CONCLUSION:

Of those with lower extremity amputation as a result of peripheral arterial disease, those with diabetes mellitus were younger, and more had trans-tibial amputation. Although both age and amputation level are good predictors of fitting with a prosthetic limb, successful limb fit rates were no better than those without diabetes mellitus. Clinical relevance This is of clinical relevance to those who are involved in the decision-making process of prosthetic fitting following major amputation for dysvascular and diabetes aetiologies.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes; prosthetics; rehabilitation

PMID:
26850990
PMCID:
PMC5302066
DOI:
10.1177/0309364616628341
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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