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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2016 Apr;74(4):679-84.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2015.10.042. Epub 2016 Feb 2.

Skin infections among US high school athletes: A national survey.

Author information

1
Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Grand Rapids, Michigan.
2
University of Central Florida College of Medicine, Orlando, Florida.
3
Department of Medical Education, University of Central Florida College of Medicine, Orlando, Florida.
4
Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado.
5
Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado; Department of Pediatrics (Emergency Medicine), University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado.
6
Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado; Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado; Dermatology Service, US Department of Veterans Affairs, Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Denver, Colorado. Electronic address: robert.dellavalle@ucdenver.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Skin infections have long been a reported problem among high school athletes, particularly wrestlers. There has yet to be a national study describing the epidemiology of skin infections across multiple high school sports.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to report the epidemiology of skin infections among US high school athletes.

METHODS:

High school sports-related skin infections resulting in time loss were reported by a convenience sample of US high schools from 2009/2010 through 2013/2014 via High School Reporting Information Online.

RESULTS:

During the study, 474 skin infections were reported among 20,858,781 athlete exposures, a rate of 2.27 per 100,000 athlete exposures. The largest number of skin infections occurred in wrestling (73.6%) followed by football (17.9%). The most common infections were bacterial (60.6%) and tinea (28.4%) infections. Body parts most often affected were the head/face (25.3%) followed by the forearm (12.7%).

LIMITATIONS:

The study included only high schools with National Athletic Trainers' Association-affiliated athletic trainers, which may limit generalizability. However, using athletic trainers as data reporters improved data quality.

CONCLUSIONS:

Skin infections are an important subset of high school sports-related adverse events. An understanding of the epidemiology of sports-related skin infections should promote awareness and drive evidence-based prevention efforts.

KEYWORDS:

athletes; competition; high school; injury; prevention; skin infections; sports

PMID:
26850656
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaad.2015.10.042
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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