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Eur J Nutr. 2017 Apr;56(3):1157-1168. doi: 10.1007/s00394-016-1165-5. Epub 2016 Feb 5.

Dietary and lifestyle determinants of acrylamide and glycidamide hemoglobin adducts in non-smoking postmenopausal women from the EPIC cohort.

Author information

1
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (ICO-IDIBELL), Avda Gran Via Barcelona 199-203, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, 08908, Barcelona, Spain.
2
Dietary Exposure Assessment Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, 69372, Lyon, France.
3
Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, Inserm, 94805, Villejuif, France.
4
UMRS 1018, Université Paris Sud, 94805, Villejuif, France.
5
Institut Gustave Roussy, 94805, Villejuif, France.
6
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany.
7
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114/116, 14558, Nuthetal, Germany.
8
Public Health and Participation Directorate, Ciriaco Miguel Vigil 9, 33009, Asturias, Spain.
9
Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs. GRANADA, Hospitales Universitarios de Granada, Universidad de Granada, Cuesta del Observatorio, 4, Campus Universitario de Cartuja, 18080, Granada, Spain.
10
CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Melchor Fernández Almagro 3-5, 28029, Madrid, Spain.
11
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa-BIODONOSTIA, Basque Regional Health Department, Avda. Navarra, 4, 20013, San Sebastián, Spain.
12
Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Authority, Ronda de Levante, 11, 30008, Murcia, Spain.
13
Navarre Public Health Institute, Polígono de Landaben C/F, 31012, Pamplona, Spain.
14
University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Robinson Way, Cambridge, CB2 0SR, UK.
15
MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, 184 Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 8PQ, UK.
16
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus, Oxford, OX3 7LF, UK.
17
Hellenic Health Foundation, 13 Kaisareias Street, 115 27, Athens, Greece.
18
Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, 23 Alexandroupoleos Street, 115 27, Athens, Greece.
19
Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, 75 M. Asias Street, Goudi, 115 27, Athens, Greece.
20
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.
21
Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Ponte Nuovo, Via delle Oblate n.2, 50141, Florence, Italy.
22
Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCSS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian, 1, 20133, Milan, Italy.
23
Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic-M.P.Arezzo" Hospital, Via Civile, 97100, Ragusa, Italy.
24
Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Via Nizza 52, 10126, Turin, Italy.
25
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London, W2 1PG, UK.
26
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Federico II University, Corso Umberto I, 40bis, 80138, Naples, Italy.
27
Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA, Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
28
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
29
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Jalan Universiti, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Wilayah Persekutuan Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
30
Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Huispost Str. 6.131, 3508GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
31
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, 1A, 9 tr, Kirurgcentrum, 952, 901 85, Umeå, Sweden.
32
Department of Biobank Research, Umeå University, 1A, 9 tr, Kirurgcentrum, 952, 901 85, Umeå, Sweden.
33
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, MS F25, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, Atlanta, GA, 30341, USA.
34
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (ICO-IDIBELL), Avda Gran Via Barcelona 199-203, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, 08908, Barcelona, Spain. eduell@iconcologia.net.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Acrylamide was classified as 'probably carcinogenic' to humans in 1994 by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. In 2002, public health concern increased when acrylamide was identified in starchy, plant-based foods, processed at high temperatures. The purpose of this study was to identify which food groups and lifestyle variables were determinants of hemoglobin adduct concentrations of acrylamide (HbAA) and glycidamide (HbGA) in 801 non-smoking postmenopausal women from eight countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort.

METHODS:

Biomarkers of internal exposure were measured in red blood cells (collected at baseline) by high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) . In this cross-sectional analysis, four dependent variables were evaluated: HbAA, HbGA, sum of total adducts (HbAA + HbGA), and their ratio (HbGA/HbAA). Simple and multiple regression analyses were used to identify determinants of the four outcome variables. All dependent variables (except HbGA/HbAA) and all independent variables were log-transformed (log2) to improve normality. Median (25th-75th percentile) HbAA and HbGA adduct levels were 41.3 (32.8-53.1) pmol/g Hb and 34.2 (25.4-46.9) pmol/g Hb, respectively.

RESULTS:

The main food group determinants of HbAA, HbGA, and HbAA + HbGA were biscuits, crackers, and dry cakes. Alcohol intake and body mass index were identified as the principal determinants of HbGA/HbAA. The total percent variation in HbAA, HbGA, HbAA + HbGA, and HbGA/HbAA explained in this study was 30, 26, 29, and 13 %, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Dietary and lifestyle factors explain a moderate proportion of acrylamide adduct variation in non-smoking postmenopausal women from the EPIC cohort.

KEYWORDS:

Acrylamide; Biomarkers; Diet; Glycidamide; Hemoglobin adducts; Nutrition

PMID:
26850269
PMCID:
PMC5576523
DOI:
10.1007/s00394-016-1165-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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