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Science. 2016 Mar 18;351(6279):1329-33. doi: 10.1126/science.aaf1648. Epub 2016 Feb 4.

Tuft cells, taste-chemosensory cells, orchestrate parasite type 2 immunity in the gut.

Author information

1
Departments of Immunology and Infectious Diseases and Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
2
Division of Gastroenterology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA 02111, USA.
3
Monell Chemical Senses Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
4
Jill Roberts Institute for Research in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA.
5
Departments of Immunology and Infectious Diseases and Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215, USA. wgarrett@hsph.harvard.edu.

Abstract

The intestinal epithelium forms an essential barrier between a host and its microbiota. Protozoa and helminths are members of the gut microbiota of mammals, including humans, yet the many ways that gut epithelial cells orchestrate responses to these eukaryotes remain unclear. Here we show that tuft cells, which are taste-chemosensory epithelial cells, accumulate during parasite colonization and infection. Disruption of chemosensory signaling through the loss of TRMP5 abrogates the expansion of tuft cells, goblet cells, eosinophils, and type 2 innate lymphoid cells during parasite colonization. Tuft cells are the primary source of the parasite-induced cytokine interleukin-25, which indirectly induces tuft cell expansion by promoting interleukin-13 production by innate lymphoid cells. Our results identify intestinal tuft cells as critical sentinels in the gut epithelium that promote type 2 immunity in response to intestinal parasites.

PMID:
26847546
PMCID:
PMC5528851
DOI:
10.1126/science.aaf1648
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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