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J Pediatr. 2016 Apr;171:248-55. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.12.063. Epub 2016 Feb 2.

Comorbidity of Atopic Disorders with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

Author information

1
Institute of Public Health, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
2
Institute of Public Health, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; Center of Neuropsychiatric Research, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Taiwan.
3
Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
4
Institute of Public Health, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; Center of Neuropsychiatric Research, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Taiwan. Electronic address: chuanychen@ym.edu.tw.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the relationship between allergic manifestations in early life and the occurrence of newly diagnosed autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) throughout childhood.

STUDY DESIGN:

We collected a population-based longitudinal cohort comprising children enrolled in Taiwan's National Health Insurance Program during 2000-2010. We first identified 387,262 children who had a diagnosis of atopic dermatitis (AD) before age 2 years, with 1:1 individualized matching to children without AD. Cox regression analyses were performed to estimate the early-onset and cumulative effects of allergic manifestations on ASD and ADHD.

RESULTS:

An estimated 0.5% of AD-exposed children received a diagnosis of ASD, and 3.7% were diagnosed with ADHD, significantly higher than the respective rates of 0.4% and 2.9% found in their nonexposed peers. Having AD before age 2 years was associated with an increased hazard ratio (HR) for ASD by 10% and that for ADHD by 16%; such increases were particularly prominent among those with earlier-onset or more severe AD. HRs were especially higher for children with persistent AD and emerging atopic respiratory diseases in childhood (eg, for ASD, adjusted HR, 1.75 and 2.13, respectively; P < .001).

CONCLUSION:

The observed increased risks of ASD and ADHD associated with AD in infancy suggest that a disordered immunologic response may exert effects on neurodevelopment and have implications for research into etiology and treatment strategies.

PMID:
26846570
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.12.063
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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