Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Med Educ. 2016 Feb 4;7:32-43. doi: 10.5116/ijme.5683.c2e0.

How do medical educators design a curriculum that facilitates student learning about professionalism?

Author information

1
Medical Education Unit, School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Australia.
2
School of Community Health, Charles Sturt University, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study analyses the ways in which curriculum reform facilitated student learning about professionalism.

METHODS:

Design-based research provided the structure for an iterative approach to curriculum change which we undertook over a 3 year period. The learning environment of the Personal and Professional Development Theme (PPD) was analysed through the sociocultural lens of Activity Theory. Lave and Wenger's and Mezirow's learning theories informed curriculum reform to support student development of a patient-centred and critically reflective professional identity. The renewed pedagogical outcomes were aligned with curriculum content, learning and teaching processes and assessment, and intense staff education was undertaken. We analysed qualitative data from tutor interviews and free-response student surveys to evaluate the impact of curriculum reform.

RESULTS:

Students' and tutors' reflections on learning in PPD converged on two principle themes--'Developing a philosophy of medicine' and 'Becoming an ethical doctor'--which corresponded to the overarching PPD theme aims of communicative learning. Students and tutors emphasised the importance of the unique learning environment of PPD tutorials for nurturing personal development and the positive impact of the renewed assessment programme on learning.

CONCLUSIONS:

A theory-led approach to curriculum reform resulted in student engagement in the PPD curriculum and facilitated a change in student perspective about the epistemological foundation of medicine.

KEYWORDS:

curriculum development; curriculum reform; design based research; discourses of professionalism; pedagogical theories

PMID:
26845777
PMCID:
PMC4744412
DOI:
10.5116/ijme.5683.c2e0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for International journal of medical education Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center