Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Pain. 2016 May;17(5):600-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jpain.2016.01.472. Epub 2016 Feb 1.

High-Definition Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Enhances Conditioned Pain Modulation in Healthy Volunteers: A Randomized Trial.

Author information

  • 1Centre for Applied Psychology, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia; University of Canberra Research Institute for Sport and Exercise, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia. Electronic address: Andrew.Flood@canberra.edu.au.
  • 2University of Canberra Research Institute for Sport and Exercise, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia; Discipline of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia.
  • 3Centre for Applied Psychology, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia; University of Canberra Research Institute for Sport and Exercise, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia.

Abstract

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a form of brain stimulation that allows for the selective increase or decrease in the cortical excitability of a targeted region. When applied over the motor cortex it has been shown to induce changes in cortical and subcortical brain regions involved in descending pain inhibition or conditioned pain modulation (CPM). The aim of the current study was to assess whether activation of pain inhibitory pathways via tDCS of the motor cortex facilitates the CPM response. Elevated CPM after active tDCS of the motor cortex was hypothesized. Thirty healthy male volunteers attended 2 experimental sessions separated by 7 days. Both sessions consisted of CPM assessment after 20 minutes of either active or sham (placebo) tDCS over the motor cortex. CPM capacity was assessed via the pain-inhibits-pain protocol; CPM responses were shown to be elevated after active compared with sham tDCS. This report concludes that tDCS of the motor cortex enhances the CPM response in healthy men. This finding supports the potential utility of tDCS interventions in clinical pain treatment.

PERSPECTIVE:

The use of noninvasive brain stimulation over the motor cortex was shown to enhance the CPM effect. This finding supports the use of tDCS in the treatment of chronic pain, particularly in sufferers exhibiting maladaptive CPM.

KEYWORDS:

Transcranial direct current stimulation; brain stimulation; conditioned pain modulation

PMID:
26844419
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpain.2016.01.472
[PubMed - in process]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center