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Prev Med Rep. 2015 Nov 17;3:25-9. doi: 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.11.006. eCollection 2016 Jun.

Generation status as a determinant of influenza vaccination among Mexican-identified adults in California, 2011-12.

Author information

1
Department of Psychological Sciences, University of California, Merced, 5200 N. Lake Road, Merced, CA, United States.
2
Department of Public Health, University of California, Merced, 5200 N. Lake Road, Merced, CA, United States.
3
Department of Public Health, University of California, Merced, 5200 N. Lake Road, Merced, CA, United States; Health Science Research Institute, University of California, Merced, 5200 N. Lake Road, Merced, CA, United States.

Abstract

First generation Latinos often have better health behaviors and outcomes than second and third generation Latinos. This study examined the correlates of seasonal influenza vaccinations among Mexican-identified (Mexican) adults, who make up the largest Latino subgroup in California. A sample of Mexican adults (N = 7493) from the 2011-12 California Interview Health Survey was used to compare the odds of first, second, and third generation Mexicans receiving influenza vaccinations in the past year. We performed a logistic regression taking into account socio-demographic characteristics, health status, and access to care. We repeated the analysis after stratifying for nativity, and then age. Being a second (odds ratio (OR) = 0.74, confidence interval (CI): 0.59, 0.92) and third generation or higher (OR = 0.66, CI: 0.51, 0.86) Mexican was associated with lower odds of getting an influenza vaccination compared to first generation Mexicans. Having a chronic disease, and access to care was associated with higher odds of vaccination, while lower age was associated with lower odds of vaccination among both US-, and foreign-born Mexicans. Given that the majority of Mexicans in California are US-born, the fact that being second- and third-generation Mexicans was associated with lower influenza vaccination rates is of significant concern.

KEYWORDS:

California; Influenza; Mexican Americans; Vaccination

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