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Prev Med Rep. 2015 Dec 3;3:14-20. doi: 10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.11.012. eCollection 2016 Jun.

Adherence to Canadian physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines among children 2 to 13 years of age.

Author information

1
Alberta Centre for Child, Family and Community Research, #200, 3820-24 Avenue NW, Calgary, AB T3B 2X9, Canada.
2
Fac. Medicine, University of Calgary, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada.
3
Fac. Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, 3-100 University Hall, Van Vliet Complex, Edmonton, AB T6G 2H9, Canada.
4
Alberta Centre for Child, Family and Community Research, #200, 3820-24 Avenue NW, Calgary, AB T3B 2X9, Canada; Fac. Medicine, University of Calgary, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6, Canada.

Abstract

Active living is relevant for healthy child development and disease prevention. In 2011-2012 new Canadian Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines were developed for children under four and 5-17 years of age. This cross-sectional study assessed children's adherence to the national guidelines, using a large sample of Alberta children ages 2-4 and 5-13 years in 2013. The proportions of children achieving the average daily duration of physical activity and screen time recommended were determined, and child and parental predictors of non-achievement were identified. Participants were 631 parent and child dyads. Data were collected by parental reports of physical activity and screen time during weekdays, and analysed using univariate and multivariate techniques (p < 0.05). Logistic regression models were used to examine factors associated with children's non-achievement of physical activity and screen time recommendations while adjusting for covariates. Sixty-two percent of children aged 2-4 and 26% of children aged 5-13 did not meet physical activity time recommendations, and 64% of children aged 2-4 and 23% of children aged 5-13 exceeded the maximum screen time recommendation. Several associations between parental age and education with non-achievement were observed but associations were not consistent across age groups or behaviours. Among preschoolers, those with middle-age parents were more likely to not achieve physical activity recommendations. Evidence of high non-achievement of the recommendations among children 2-4 years highlights the need for increased programming targeting preschool children. Further research is required to identify modifiable risk factors that may inform future health promotion efforts.

KEYWORDS:

Children active living; Health promotion; Physical activity; Screen time; Sedentary behaviour

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