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Ethn Dis. 2016 Jan 21;26(1):123-32. doi: 10.18865/ed.26.1.123.

The Healthy Community Neighborhood Initiative: Rationale and Design.

Author information

1
Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research, David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute.
2
Los Angeles Urban League.
3
Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science; Healthy African American Families.
4
Healthy African American Families.
5
Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute.
6
Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the design and rationale of the Healthy Community Neighborhood Initiative (HCNI), a multi-component study to understand and document health risk and resources in a low-income and minority community.

DESIGN:

A community-partnered participatory research project.

SETTING:

A low-income, biethnic African American and Latino neighborhood in South Los Angeles.

PARTICIPANTS:

Adult community residents aged >18 years.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Household survey and clinical data collection; neighborhood characteristics; neighborhood observations; and community resources asset mapping.

RESULTS:

We enrolled 206 participants (90% of those eligible), of whom 205 completed the household interview and examination, and 199 provided laboratory samples. Among enrollees, 82 (40%) were aged >50 years and participated in functional status measurement. We completed neighborhood observations on 93 street segments; an average of 2.2 (SD=1.6) study participants resided on each street segment observed. The community asset map identified 290 resources summarized in a Community Resource Guide given to all participants.

CONCLUSIONS:

The HCNI community-academic partnership has built a framework to assess and document the individual, social, and community factors that may influence clinical and social outcomes in a community at high-risk for preventable chronic disease. Our project suggests that a community collaborative can use culturally and scientifically sound strategies to identify community-centered health and social needs. Additional work is needed to understand strategies for developing and implementing interventions to mitigate these disparities.

KEYWORDS:

African American; Chronic Disease; Community Assets; Community-Partnered Research; Design; Latino; Rationale; Under-resourced Communities

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