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J Nutr. 2016 Mar;146(3):524-31. doi: 10.3945/jn.115.224774. Epub 2016 Feb 3.

Coffee Consumption Increases the Antioxidant Capacity of Plasma and Has No Effect on the Lipid Profile or Vascular Function in Healthy Adults in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

Author information

1
Vidarium, Nutrition, Health and Wellness Research Center, Nutresa Business Group, Medellín, Colombia; School of Nutrition and Dietetics, gloria.agudelo@udea.edu.co.
2
Vidarium, Nutrition, Health and Wellness Research Center, Nutresa Business Group, Medellín, Colombia;
3
Research Group in Food and Human Nutrition, and.
4
Cardiology Group, CES University, Medellín, Colombia; and.
5
Colcafé Research Coffee Group, Colcafé S.A.S., Medellín, Colombia.
6
Vidarium, Nutrition, Health and Wellness Research Center, Nutresa Business Group, Medellín, Colombia; Bioactive Substance Research Group, University of Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia;

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Coffee, a source of antioxidants, has controversial effects on cardiovascular health.

OBJECTIVE:

We evaluated the bioavailability of chlorogenic acids (CGAs) in 2 coffees and the effects of their consumption on the plasma antioxidant capacity (AC), the serum lipid profile, and the vascular function in healthy adults.

METHODS:

Thirty-eight men and 37 women with a mean ± SD age of 38.5 ± 9 y and body mass index of 24.1 ± 2.6 kg/m(2) were randomly assigned to 3 groups: a control group that did not consume coffee or a placebo and 2 groups that consumed 400 mL coffee/d for 8 wk containing a medium (MCCGA; 420 mg) or high (HCCGA; 780 mg) CGA content. Both were low in diterpenes (0.83 mg/d) and caffeine (193 mg/d). Plasma caffeic and ferulic acid concentrations were measured by GC, and the plasma AC was evaluated with use of the ferric-reducing antioxidant power method. The serum lipid profile, nitric oxide (NO) plasma metabolites, vascular endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation; FMD), and blood pressure (BP) were evaluated.

RESULTS:

After coffee consumption (1 h and 8 wk), caffeic and ferulic acid concentrations increased in the coffee-drinking groups, although the values of the 2 groups were significantly different (P < 0.001); caffeic and ferulic acid concentrations were undetectable in the control group. At 1 h after consumption, the plasma AC in the control group was significantly lower than the baseline value (-2%) and significantly increased in the MCCGA (6%) and HCCGA (5%) groups (P < 0.05). After 8 wk, no significant differences in the lipid, FMD, BP, or NO plasma metabolite values were observed between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Both coffees, which contained CGAs and were low in diterpenes and caffeine, provided bioavailable CGAs and had a positive acute effect on the plasma AC in healthy adults and no effect on blood lipids or vascular function. The group that did not drink coffee showed no improvement in serum lipid profile, FMD, BP, or NO plasma metabolites. This trial was registered at registroclinico.sld.cu as RPCEC00000168.

KEYWORDS:

caffeine; cardiovascular disease; chlorogenic acids; cholesterol; diterpenes; flow-mediated dilation; oxidative stress; phenolic acids

PMID:
26843588
DOI:
10.3945/jn.115.224774
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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