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J Muscle Res Cell Motil. 2016 Apr;37(1-2):1-5. doi: 10.1007/s10974-016-9441-9. Epub 2016 Feb 3.

Improving human skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain fiber typing efficiency.

Author information

1
Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Center for Muscle Biology, College of Health Sciences, University of Kentucky, MS-508 Chandler Medical Center, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY, 40508, USA. kmu236@g.uky.edu.
2
Muscle Physiology Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue-Gym 101, San Francisco, CA, 94132, USA.
3
Biochemistry and Molecular Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, Center for Sport Performance, California State University, Fullerton, 800 North State College Blvd, Fullerton, CA, 92834, USA.
4
Department of Physiology, University of Kentucky, MS-508 Chandler Medical Center, Lexington, KY, 40536, USA.

Abstract

Single muscle fiber sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) is a sensitive technique for determining skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of human biopsy samples. However, the number of fibers suitable to represent fiber type distribution via this method is undefined. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis (VL) of nine resistance-trained males (25 ± 1 year, height = 179 ± 5 cm, mass = 82 ± 8 kg). Single fiber MHC composition was determined via SDS-PAGE. VL fiber type distribution [percent MHC I, I/IIa, IIa, IIa/IIx, and total "hybrids" (i.e. I/IIa + IIa/IIx)] was evaluated according to number of fibers analyzed per person (25 vs. 125). VL fiber type distribution did not differ according to number of fibers analyzed (P > 0.05). VL biopsy fiber type distribution of nine subjects is represented by analyzing 25 fibers per person. These data may help minimize cost, personnel-time, and materials associated with this technique, thereby improving fiber typing efficiency in humans.

KEYWORDS:

Hybrid fibers; Muscle biopsy; SDS-PAGE; Vastus lateralis

PMID:
26842420
DOI:
10.1007/s10974-016-9441-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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