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BMJ Open. 2016 Feb 3;6(2):e010031. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010031.

Genetics of Glucose regulation in Gestation and Growth (Gen3G): a prospective prebirth cohort of mother-child pairs in Sherbrooke, Canada.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
2
Faculty of Sciences, Department of Mathematics, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
3
Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
4
Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, Department of Biochemistry, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada ECOGENE-21 and Lipid Clinic, Chicoutimi Hospital, Saguenay, Quebec, Canada.
5
Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
6
Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, Department of Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We initiated the Genetics of Glucose regulation in Gestation and Growth (Gen3G) prospective cohort to increase our understanding of biological, environmental and genetic determinants of glucose regulation during pregnancy and their impact on fetal development.

PARTICIPANTS:

Between January 2010 and June 2013, we invited pregnant women aged ≥ 18 years old who visited the blood sampling in pregnancy clinic in Sherbrooke for their first trimester clinical blood samples: 1034 women accepted to participate in our cohort study.

FINDINGS TO DATE:

At first and second trimester, we collected demographics and lifestyle questionnaires, anthropometry measures (including fat and lean mass estimated using bioimpedance), blood pressure, and blood samples. At second trimester, women completed a full 75 g oral glucose tolerance test and we collected additional blood samples. At delivery, we collected cord blood and placenta samples; obstetrical and neonatal clinical data were abstracted from electronic medical records. We also collected buffy coats and extracted DNA from maternal and/or offspring samples (placenta and blood cells) to pursue genetic and epigenetic hypotheses. So far, we have found that low adiponectin and low vitamin D maternal levels in first trimester predict higher risk of developing gestational diabetes.

FUTURE PLANS:

We are now in the phase of prospective follow-up of mothers and offspring 3 and 5 years postdelivery to investigate the consequences of maternal dysglycaemia during pregnancy on offspring adiposity and metabolic profile.

TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER:

NCT01623934.

KEYWORDS:

EPIDEMIOLOGY; GENETICS

PMID:
26842272
PMCID:
PMC4746442
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2015-010031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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