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N Engl J Med. 2016 Feb 4;374(5):434-43. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1509819.

Metformin versus Placebo in Obese Pregnant Women without Diabetes Mellitus.

Author information

1
From the Harris Birthright Research Centre for Fetal Medicine, King's College Hospital (A.S., K.H.N., R.A., R.K., A.P.), and the Departments of Endocrinology (J.B., S.H.) and Maternal Medicine (H.S.), Epsom and St. Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust, London, and the Department of Fetal Medicine, Medway Maritime Hospital, Gillingham, Kent (R.A.) - all in the United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obesity is associated with an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Lifestyle-intervention studies have not shown improved outcomes. Metformin improves insulin sensitivity and in pregnant patients with gestational diabetes it leads to less weight gain than occurs in those who do not take metformin.

METHODS:

In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned pregnant women without diabetes who had a body-mass index (BMI; the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) of more than 35 to receive metformin, at a dose of 3.0 g per day, or placebo (225 women in each group) from 12 to 18 weeks of gestation until delivery. The BMI was calculated at the time of study entry (12 to 18 weeks of gestation). The primary outcome was a reduction in the median neonatal birth-weight z score by 0.3 SD (equivalent to a 50% reduction, from 20% to 10%, in the incidence of large-for-gestational-age neonates). Secondary outcomes included maternal gestational weight gain and the incidence of gestational diabetes and of preeclampsia, as well as the incidence of adverse neonatal outcomes. Randomization was performed with the use of computer-generated random numbers. The analysis was performed according to the intention-to-treat principle.

RESULTS:

A total of 50 women withdrew consent during the trial, which left 202 women in the metformin group and 198 in the placebo group. There was no significant between-group difference in the median neonatal birth-weight z score (0.05 in the metformin group [interquartile range, -0.71 to 0.92] and 0.17 in the placebo group [interquartile range, -0.62 to 0.89], P=0.66). The median maternal gestational weight gain was lower in the metformin group than in the placebo group (4.6 kg [interquartile range, 1.3 to 7.2] vs. 6.3 kg [interquartile range, 2.9 to 9.2], P<0.001), as was the incidence of preeclampsia (3.0% vs. 11.3%; odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.10 to 0.61; P=0.001). The incidence of side effects was higher in the metformin group than in the placebo group. There were no significant between-group differences in the incidence of gestational diabetes, large-for-gestational-age neonates, or adverse neonatal outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among women without diabetes who had a BMI of more than 35, the antenatal administration of metformin reduced maternal weight gain but not neonatal birth weight. (Funded by the Fetal Medicine Foundation; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01273584; EudraCT number, 2008-005892-83.).

PMID:
26840133
DOI:
10.1056/NEJMoa1509819
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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