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J Biomed Opt. 2016 Feb;21(2):25003. doi: 10.1117/1.JBO.21.2.025003.

Minimally invasive surgical method to detect sound processing in the cochlear apex by optical coherence tomography.

Author information

1
Oregon Health and Science University, Oregon Hearing Research Center, Department of Otolaryngology, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, NRC 04, Portland, Oregon 97239, United States.
2
Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 3303 Bond Street, Portland, Oregon 97239, United States.
3
Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology SE-58185, Linköping, Sweden.
4
University of Washington, Department of Bioengineering, William H. Foege Building, P.O. Box 355061, 3720 15th Avenue NE, Seattle, Washington 98195-5061, United States.
5
Oregon Health and Science University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 3303 Bond Street, Portland, Oregon 97239, United StateseOregon Health and Science University, Department of Dermatology, Portland, Oregon 97239, United States.
6
Oregon Health and Science University, Oregon Hearing Research Center, Department of Otolaryngology, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, NRC 04, Portland, Oregon 97239, United StatesfUniversity of Michigan, Kresge Hearing Research Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48.

Abstract

Sound processing in the inner ear involves separation of the constituent frequencies along the length of the cochlea. Frequencies relevant to human speech (100 to 500 Hz) are processed in the apex region. Among mammals, the guinea pig cochlear apex processes similar frequencies and is thus relevant for the study of speech processing in the cochlea. However, the requirement for extensive surgery has challenged the optical accessibility of this area to investigate cochlear processing of signals without significant intrusion. A simple method is developed to provide optical access to the guinea pig cochlear apex in two directions with minimal surgery. Furthermore, all prior vibration measurements in the guinea pig apex involved opening an observation hole in the otic capsule, which has been questioned on the basis of the resulting changes to cochlear hydrodynamics. Here, this limitation is overcome by measuring the vibrations through the unopened otic capsule using phase-sensitive Fourier domain optical coherence tomography. The optically and surgically advanced method described here lays the foundation to perform minimally invasive investigation of speech-related signal processing in the cochlea.

PMID:
26836207
PMCID:
PMC4796094
DOI:
10.1117/1.JBO.21.2.025003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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