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Trends Neurosci. 2016 Mar;39(3):158-169. doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2016.01.003. Epub 2016 Jan 30.

BACE1 Physiological Functions May Limit Its Use as Therapeutic Target for Alzheimer's Disease.

Author information

1
VIB Center for the Biology of Disease, 3000 Leuven, Belgium; Center for Human Genetics, Universitaire Ziekenhuizen and LIND, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.
2
Neuroscience Department, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, Janssen Pharmaceutica, Turnhoutseweg 30, 2340 Beerse, Belgium.
3
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy), Feodor-Lynen-Straße 17, 81377 München, Germany; Neuroproteomics, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, and Institute for Advanced Study, Technische Universität München, 81675 München, Germany.
4
VIB Center for the Biology of Disease, 3000 Leuven, Belgium; Center for Human Genetics, Universitaire Ziekenhuizen and LIND, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium; Institute of Neurology, University College London, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK. Electronic address: Bart.DeStrooper@cme.vib-kuleuven.be.

Abstract

The protease β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP)-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is required for the production of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, which is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Chronic inhibition of this protease may temper amyloid production and cure or prevent AD. However, while BACE1 inhibitors are being pushed forward as drug candidates, a remarkable gap in knowledge on the physiological functions of BACE1 and its close homolog BACE2 becomes apparent. Here we discuss the major discoveries of the past 3 years concerning BACE1 biology and to what extent these could limit the use of BACE1 inhibitors in the clinic.

KEYWORDS:

APP; Alzheimer's disease; BACE1; C-terminal fragments; therapeutic target

PMID:
26833257
DOI:
10.1016/j.tins.2016.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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