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FEMS Microbiol Rev. 2016 May;40(3):343-72. doi: 10.1093/femsre/fuw001. Epub 2016 Jan 31.

Merozoite surface proteins in red blood cell invasion, immunity and vaccines against malaria.

Author information

1
Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health, 85 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Department of Microbiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia beeson@burnet.edu.au.
2
Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health, 85 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
3
Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health, 85 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia School of Population Health, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
4
Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health, 85 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Department of Microbiology, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

Malaria accounts for an enormous burden of disease globally, with Plasmodium falciparum accounting for the majority of malaria, and P. vivax being a second important cause, especially in Asia, the Americas and the Pacific. During infection with Plasmodium spp., the merozoite form of the parasite invades red blood cells and replicates inside them. It is during the blood-stage of infection that malaria disease occurs and, therefore, understanding merozoite invasion, host immune responses to merozoite surface antigens, and targeting merozoite surface proteins and invasion ligands by novel vaccines and therapeutics have been important areas of research. Merozoite invasion involves multiple interactions and events, and substantial processing of merozoite surface proteins occurs before, during and after invasion. The merozoite surface is highly complex, presenting a multitude of antigens to the immune system. This complexity has proved challenging to our efforts to understand merozoite invasion and malaria immunity, and to developing merozoite antigens as malaria vaccines. In recent years, there has been major progress in this field, and several merozoite surface proteins show strong potential as malaria vaccines. Our current knowledge on this topic is reviewed, highlighting recent advances and research priorities.

KEYWORDS:

Plasmodium falciparum; Plasmodium vivax; antibodies; immunity; invasion; merozoites; vaccines

PMID:
26833236
PMCID:
PMC4852283
DOI:
10.1093/femsre/fuw001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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