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Environ Monit Assess. 2016 Feb;188(2):125. doi: 10.1007/s10661-016-5093-x. Epub 2016 Jan 29.

Ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in soils surrounding oil waste disposal areas.

Author information

1
State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Vegetation Restoration, School of Environment, Northeast Normal University, 130117, Changchun, People's Republic of China. xujl@foxmail.com.
2
State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Vegetation Restoration, School of Environment, Northeast Normal University, 130117, Changchun, People's Republic of China. wanghanxizs1982@126.com.
3
State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Vegetation Restoration, School of Environment, Northeast Normal University, 130117, Changchun, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

More attention is being devoted to heavy metal pollution because heavy metals can concentrate in higher animals through the food chain, harm human health and threaten the stability of the ecological environment. In this study, the effects of heavy metals (Cu, Cr, Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni and Hg) emanating from oil waste disposal on surrounding soil in Jilin Province, China, were investigated. A potential ecological risk index was used to evaluate the damage of heavy metals and concluded that the degree of potential ecological damage of heavy metals can be ranked as follows: Hg > Cd > Pb > Cu > Ni > Cr > Zn. The average value of the potential ecological harm index (Ri) is 71.93, thereby indicating light pollution. In addition, this study researched the spatial distribution of soil heavy metals by means of ArcGIS (geographic information system) spatial analysis software. The results showed that the potential ecological risk index (R) of the large value was close to the distance from the oil waste disposal area; it is relatively between the degree of heavy metals in soil and the distance from the waste disposal area.

KEYWORDS:

ArcGIS; Ecological risk assessment; Heavy metals; Oil waste; Spatial distribution

PMID:
26832722
DOI:
10.1007/s10661-016-5093-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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