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Cell Rep. 2016 Feb 9;14(5):1218-1231. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.01.002. Epub 2016 Jan 28.

Expression of CD39 on Activated T Cells Impairs their Survival in Older Individuals.

Author information

1
Departments of Medicine, Pediatrics, and Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; Department of Medicine, Palo Alto Veterans Administration Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA.
2
Departments of Medicine, Pediatrics, and Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
3
Departments of Medicine, Pediatrics, and Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; Department of Medicine, Palo Alto Veterans Administration Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA. Electronic address: jgoronzy@stanford.edu.

Abstract

In an immune response, CD4(+) T cells expand into effector T cells and then contract to survive as long-lived memory cells. To identify age-associated defects in memory cell formation, we profiled activated CD4(+) T cells and found an increased induction of the ATPase CD39 with age. CD39(+) CD4(+) T cells resembled effector T cells with signs of metabolic stress and high susceptibility to undergo apoptosis. Pharmacological inhibition of ATPase activity dampened effector cell differentiation and improved survival, suggesting that CD39 activity influences T cell fate. Individuals carrying a low-expressing CD39 variant responded better to vaccination with an increase in vaccine-specific memory T cells. Increased inducibility of CD39 after activation may contribute to the impaired vaccine response with age.

PMID:
26832412
PMCID:
PMC4851554
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2016.01.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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