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Trends Ecol Evol. 2016 Mar;31(3):226-236. doi: 10.1016/j.tree.2015.12.016. Epub 2016 Jan 29.

Recombination Rate Evolution and the Origin of Species.

Author information

1
The University of Queensland, School of Biological Sciences, St. Lucia, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: d.ortizbarrientos@uq.edu.au.
2
The University of Queensland, School of Biological Sciences, St. Lucia, Queensland, Australia.
3
University of British Columbia, Department of Botany, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Indiana University, Biology Department, Bloomington, IN 47405-7005, USA.

Abstract

A recipe for dissolving incipient species into a continuum of phenotypes is to recombine their genetic material. Therefore, students of speciation have become increasingly interested in the mechanisms by which recombination between locally adapted lineages is reduced. Evidence abounds that chromosomal rearrangements, via their suppression of recombination during meiosis in hybrids, play a major role in adaptation and speciation. By contrast, genic modifiers of recombination rates have been largely ignored in studies of speciation. We show how both types of reduction in recombination rates facilitate divergence in the face of gene flow, including the early stages of adaptive divergence, the persistence of species after secondary contact, and reinforcement.

PMID:
26831635
DOI:
10.1016/j.tree.2015.12.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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