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Community Ment Health J. 2016 Jul;52(5):534-40. doi: 10.1007/s10597-016-9987-4. Epub 2016 Jan 29.

The Relationship Between Suicide Ideation, Behavioral Health, and College Academic Performance.

Author information

1
School of Social Work and The Center for Women's and Gender Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, 1925 San Jacinto Blvd., Stop D3500, Austin, TX, 78712, USA. sdeluca@austin.utexas.edu.
2
School of Social Work and The Center for Women's and Gender Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, 1925 San Jacinto Blvd., Stop D3500, Austin, TX, 78712, USA.
3
School of Social Welfare, The University of Kansas, 1545 Lilac Lane, Lawrence, KS, 66045, USA.
4
Counseling and Mental Health Center, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station A3500, Austin, TX, 78712, USA.

Abstract

The impact of suicidal ideation on college students' academic performance has yet to be examined, yet mental health is often linked with academic performance. Underclassmen and upperclassmen were compared on behavioral health outcomes related to academic success (N = 26,457). Ideation (b = -0.05, p < .05), increased mental health (b = -0.03, p < .01) or substance use severity (b = -0.02, p < .01) was associated with lower GPAs. Underclassmen's behavioral health severity was related to lower GPA. Students reported higher GPAs when participating in extracurricular activities during the past year. Ideation, beyond mental health, is an important when assessing academic performance. Increasing students' connections benefits students experiencing behavioral concerns but also aids in suicide prevention initiatives and improves academic outcomes. Creating integrated health care systems on campus where physical, mental health and academic support services is crucial to offer solutions for students with severe or co-morbid mental health histories.

KEYWORDS:

Academic outcomes; College students; Mental health; Substance use

PMID:
26831304
DOI:
10.1007/s10597-016-9987-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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