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Crit Care Nurse. 2016 Feb;36(1):60-70. doi: 10.4037/ccn2016541.

Implementing Electronic Tablet-Based Education of Acute Care Patients.

Author information

1
Tenita Sawyer is a clinical nurse at the Duke Heart Center, Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina.Monica J. Nelson is a nurse at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.Vickie McKee is a clinical nurse at the Duke Heart Center, Duke University Health System.Margaret T. Bowers is an assistant professor at the Duke University School of Nursing and Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina.Corilin Meggitt is a nurse at the Duke University School of Nursing.Sarah K. Baxt is a nurse at the Duke University School of Nursing.Delphine Washington is nurse manager, education, cardiology nursing, Duke Heart Center, Duke University Health System.Louise Saladino is clinical operations director, cardiology nursing, Duke Heart Center, Duke University Health System.E. Philip Lehman IV is a fellow in cardiovascular disease at the Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina.Cheryl Brewer is manager of clinical trials operations and project management, Duke Cancer Care Research Program/Center for Learning Health Care, Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, North Carolina.Susan C. Locke is senior scientist and project leader at the Center for Learning Health Care, Duke Clinical Research Institute.Amy Abernethy is director of the Duke Center for Learning Health Care and a professor in the Duke University Department of Medicine and School of Nursing.Catherine L. Gilliss is dean of the Duke University School of Nursing.Bradi B. Granger is director of the Duke Heart Center Nursing Research Program and an associate professor in the Duke University School of Nursing.
2
Tenita Sawyer is a clinical nurse at the Duke Heart Center, Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina.Monica J. Nelson is a nurse at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.Vickie McKee is a clinical nurse at the Duke Heart Center, Duke University Health System.Margaret T. Bowers is an assistant professor at the Duke University School of Nursing and Duke University Health System, Durham, North Carolina.Corilin Meggitt is a nurse at the Duke University School of Nursing.Sarah K. Baxt is a nurse at the Duke University School of Nursing.Delphine Washington is nurse manager, education, cardiology nursing, Duke Heart Center, Duke University Health System.Louise Saladino is clinical operations director, cardiology nursing, Duke Heart Center, Duke University Health System.E. Philip Lehman IV is a fellow in cardiovascular disease at the Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina.Cheryl Brewer is manager of clinical trials operations and project management, Duke Cancer Care Research Program/Center for Learning Health Care, Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, North Carolina.Susan C. Locke is senior scientist and project leader at the Center for Learning Health Care, Duke Clinical Research Institute.Amy Abernethy is director of the Duke Center for Learning Health Care and a professor in the Duke University Department of Medicine and School of Nursing.Catherine L. Gilliss is dean of the Duke University School of Nursing.Bradi B. Granger is director of the Duke Heart Center Nursing Research Program and an associate professor in the Duke University School of Nursing. grang004@mc.duke.edu.

Abstract

Poor education-related discharge preparedness for patients with heart failure is believed to be a major cause of avoidable rehospitalizations. Technology-based applications offer innovative educational approaches that may improve educational readiness for patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings; however, a number of challenges exist when implementing electronic devices in the clinical setting. Implementation challenges include processes for "on-boarding" staff, mediating risks of cross-contamination with patients' device use, and selling the value to staff and health system leaders to secure the investment in software, hardware, and system support infrastructure. Strategies to address these challenges are poorly described in the literature. The purpose of this article is to present a staff development program designed to overcome challenges in implementing an electronic, tablet-based education program for patients with heart failure.

PMID:
26830181
DOI:
10.4037/ccn2016541
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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