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J Am Coll Health. 2016 May-Jun;64(4):309-17. doi: 10.1080/07448481.2016.1138479.

Hookah and Cigarette Smoking Among African American College Students: Implications for Campus Risk Reduction And Health Promotion Efforts.

Author information

1
a Department of Education , Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis , St. Louis , Missouri , USA.
2
b George Warren Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis , St. Louis , Missouri , USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify individual and institutional risks and protections for hookah and cigarette smoking among African American (AA) college students.

PARTICIPANTS:

AA college students (N = 1,402; mean age = 20, range = 18-24 years; 75% female) who completed the Fall 2012 American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II.

METHODS:

Respondents were stratified into 4 mutually exclusive groups by last-30-day smoking status: cigarette-only use (5.1%), hookah-only use (5.9%), dual use (2.4%), and nonuse (86.6%). Multinomial logistic regression models identified the relative odds of exclusive and dual hookah and cigarette smoking.

RESULTS:

Current hookah and cigarette smoking rates were comparably low. Age, gender identity, current substance use, interest in tobacco use information, and student population prevailed as risks and protections for hookah and cigarette smoking.

CONCLUSIONS:

Campus health promotion campaigns may need to tailor messages to AA students, particularly those who use substances, to underscore the health risks of hookah and cigarette smoking.

KEYWORDS:

African American; college students; health promotion; smoking; tobacco use

PMID:
26829515
PMCID:
PMC4960822
DOI:
10.1080/07448481.2016.1138479
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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