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J Hepatol. 2016 Jun;64(6):1224-31. doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2016.01.029. Epub 2016 Jan 30.

Impact of direct acting antiviral therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C and decompensated cirrhosis.

Author information

1
Queen Mary University of London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: g.r.foster@qmul.ac.uk.
2
NIHR Nottingham Digestive Diseases Biomedical Research Unit, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Will.irving@nottingham.ac.uk.
3
Liver Unit, Blizard Institute, Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom.
4
Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom.
5
University Hospitals Bristol NHS Trust, United Kingdom.
6
Institute of Liver Studies, King's College London, United Kingdom.
7
MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, United Kingdom.
8
Centre for Liver Research and NIHR Biomedical Research Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
9
Department of Hepatology, St Mary's Hospital, Imperial College London, United Kingdom.
10
Department of Hepatology, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, United Kingdom.
11
UCL Institute for Liver and Digestive Health, University College London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

All oral direct acting antivirals (DAAs) effectively treat chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but the benefits in advanced liver disease are unclear. We compared outcomes in treated and untreated patients with decompensated cirrhosis.

METHODS:

Patients with HCV and decompensated cirrhosis or at risk of irreversible disease were treated in an expanded access programme (EAP) in 2014. Treatment, by clinician choice, was with sofosbuvir, ledipasvir or daclatasvir, with or without ribavirin. For functional outcome comparison, untreated patients with HCV and decompensated cirrhosis who were registered on a database 6months before treatment was available were retrospectively studied. Primary endpoint was sustained virological response 12weeks post antiviral treatment (treated cohort) and the secondary endpoint (both cohorts) was adverse outcomes (worsening in MELD score or serious adverse event) within 6months.

RESULTS:

467 patients received treatment (409 decompensated cirrhosis). Viral clearance was achieved in 381 patients (81.6%) - 209 from 231 (90.5%) with genotype 1 and 132 from 192 (68.8%) with genotype 3. MELD scores improved in treated patients (mean change -0.85) but worsened in untreated patients (mean+0.75) (p<0.0001). Patients with initial serum albumin <35g/L, aged >65 or with low (<135mmol/L) baseline serum sodium concentrations were least likely to benefit from therapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

All oral DAAs effectively cured HCV in patients with advanced liver disease. Viral clearance was associated with improvement in liver function within 6months compared to untreated patients. The longer term impact of HCV treatment in patients with decompensated cirrhosis remains to be determined.

KEYWORDS:

Daclatasvir; Decompensated cirrhosis; Hepatitis C virus; Ledipasvir; MELD score; Sofosbuvir

PMID:
26829205
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhep.2016.01.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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