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Virology. 2016 Mar;490:49-58. doi: 10.1016/j.virol.2016.01.004. Epub 2016 Jan 30.

3B11-N, a monoclonal antibody against MERS-CoV, reduces lung pathology in rhesus monkeys following intratracheal inoculation of MERS-CoV Jordan-n3/2012.

Author information

1
Emerging Viral Pathogens Section National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702, USA. Electronic address: johnsonreed@mail.nih.gov.
2
Center for Infectious Disease Imaging, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda MD 20892, USA; Center for Research in Computer Vision (CRCV), Department of Electrics Electronics and Computer Science, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, USA.
3
Integrated Research Facility, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702, USA.
4
Department of Cancer Immunology & AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
5
Center for Infectious Disease Imaging, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda MD 20892, USA.
6
Mapp Biopharmaceutical, Inc., San Diego CA 92121, USA.
7
Biostatistics Research Branch, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
8
Clinical Research Directorate/Clinical Monitoring Research Program, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research,Frederick, MD 21702-USA.
9
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.
10
Emerging Viral Pathogens Section National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702, USA; Integrated Research Facility, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702, USA.

Abstract

Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was identified in 2012 as the causative agent of a severe, lethal respiratory disease occurring across several countries in the Middle East. To date there have been over 1600 laboratory confirmed cases of MERS-CoV in 26 countries with a case fatality rate of 36%. Given the endemic region, it is possible that MERS-CoV could spread during the annual Hajj pilgrimage, necessitating countermeasure development. In this report, we describe the clinical and radiographic changes of rhesus monkeys following infection with 5×10(6) PFU MERS-CoV Jordan-n3/2012. Two groups of NHPs were treated with either a human anti-MERS monoclonal antibody 3B11-N or E410-N, an anti-HIV antibody. MERS-CoV Jordan-n3/2012 infection resulted in quantifiable changes by computed tomography, but limited other clinical signs of disease. 3B11-N treated subjects developed significantly reduced lung pathology when compared to infected, untreated subjects, indicating that this antibody may be a suitable MERS-CoV treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Animal model, MERS; Antibody therapy; Human monoclonal antibody therapy; MERS-CoV; Respiratory syndrome

PMID:
26828465
PMCID:
PMC4769911
[Available on 2017-03-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.virol.2016.01.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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