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Eur Respir J. 2016 Feb;47(2):410-9. doi: 10.1183/13993003.01359-2015.

Treatable traits: toward precision medicine of chronic airway diseases.

Author information

1
Respiratory Institute, Hospital Clinic, IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Barcelona and CIBER Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), Spain Alvar.Agusti@clinic.ub.es.
2
Dept of Respiratory Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Primary Care and Population Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
4
Dept of Medicine, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University Medical Center Giessen and Marburg, Philipps-Universität Marburg, and Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Germany.
5
Dept of Respiratory Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium Depts of Epidemiology and Respiratory Medicine, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
6
Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UK.
7
Université Paris-Sud; Service de Pneumologie, Hôpital Bicêtre (Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris); INSERM UMR_S 999, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France.
8
St George's University of London, London, UK.
9
Dept of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, John Hunter Hospital, Hunter Medical Research Institute, and Priority Research Centre for Asthma and Respiratory Disease, The University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
10
Centre for Respiratory Medicine and Allergy, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University Hospital South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK.
11
Medical Research Institute of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand.
12
Respiratory Medicine Unit, NDM Research Building, Nuffield Dept of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Abstract

Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are two prevalent chronic airway diseases that have a high personal and social impact. They likely represent a continuum of different diseases that may share biological mechanisms (i.e. endotypes), and present similar clinical, functional, imaging and/or biological features that can be observed (i.e. phenotypes) which require individualised treatment. Precision medicine is defined as "treatments targeted to the needs of individual patients on the basis of genetic, biomarker, phenotypic, or psychosocial characteristics that distinguish a given patient from other patients with similar clinical presentations". In this Perspective, we propose a precision medicine strategy for chronic airway diseases in general, and asthma and COPD in particular.

PMID:
26828055
DOI:
10.1183/13993003.01359-2015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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